So you want to be a market trader

Marlay House


 

I’m often asked for advice by people thinking about setting up a market stall. So for anyone interested here are a few tips:

 

1. Trading licenses are granted by the local council on the advice of the market manager. 

   Your first approach should be to the market manager who will let you know if your  

   proposition is likely to be approved. You stand a better chance if what you are 

   offering is innovative and does not compete with current stall holders - something 

   unique has a better chance of success anyway;

 

2. Apply in Spring with a view to starting in Summer allowing you to get a feel for   

   things before investing in expensive shelters;

 

3. Make sure you get your costings right. Apart from material and labour costs in the  

   production of what you are selling there is the monthly license fee and annual public 

   liability insurance. Costing in time spent on market days is down to the individual. 

   Some see the market as a promotional opportunity for an online business or a business 

   in a permanent high street location. Some use it for market research. Some will not 

   fully cost their time and see it in terms of cash flow or simply as a social outlet. It 

   should be borne in mind that for a market that runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (6 hours) 

   the working time is approx. 11 hours allowing for loading/unloading at each end, 

   travel time, set up and take down. Even at minimum wage the gross profit for the day 

   would need to be at least Є150 to break even (remember that’s profit and not 

   sales) and much greater if you are to consider this as a business. The chances of that 

   happening are slim to none. So why do we do it? For all of the reasons mentioned 

   above or a combination of these.

   Of course I’m only referring to craft markets. Turnover on hot food is much greater 

   but that also has it’s own risks and exceptional costs. License fees are greater and 

   electricity charges are extra. Food safety and hygiene standards are very exacting.  

   Judging perishable food stocks is almost a science but requires lots of assumptions 

   and accurate weather forecasts. Getting it wrong can lead to serious losses. Too much 

   and you face the prospect of dumping the excess. Too little and you go home early 

   kicking every cat and dog along the way. The initial investment for mobile food 

   vendors is high and it’s hard graft. On a busy stand you may also have a couple of 

   extra staff to pay;

 

4. The key to success is low priced, high turnover items with novelty value. I’ve seen 

   quite a few traders with high quality, beautifully designed and crafted work come and 

   go. Their work may be stocked by Avoca or Kilkenny Design but this is not what 

   people buy at markets. I do understand why they come to the market. The design 

   stores sell at high prices but the producer only sees a small percentage of that. They 

   come to the craft markets for a greater return but must substantially undercut the 

   design shops. The product loses it’s cachet and the design shops are none too happy. It 

   can only end one way;

 

5.  And finally - follow your own instincts and only take advice from those with 

   experience. Listen carefully to all of your customers but beware of their helpful 

   money-making suggestions. I’ve learned that to my cost more than once.

 

If none of the above has deterred you you’re probably on your way to being a great success or else you’re just as stubborn as me.  

 


Be the first to post a comment.



Previously published:

 blue sky artCo. Wicklow, Ireland353 89 4611522

RSS |